April 25, 2014

• Help us promote the job we love; we have our first submission

• It’s political season and there’s another political ad question

• FAA might not let drone idea fly

• Interns set to begin 10-week journey learning about the real world of journalism

• TPA room reservation deadline today; come on down to Gatlinburg June 5-7

• You can help with internships with foundation contributions or signing up for the 2014 Border War II golf tournament – ‘Battle at Crooked Creek’

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We have our first ‘I my job’ submission 

Last week, I mentioned the survey that showed newspaper reporter jobs are the second worst and while it may not be the perfect job, those that are reporters do it for a reason. And that gave me the idea of starting an ‘I ♥ my job’ campaign, developing ads for newspapers to use with comments from KPA members about why they do what they do.

Not long after, Lebanon publisher/KPA Board member Stevie Lowery sent her contribution and we’ve developed that into an ad.

Stevie Lowery – I Love My Job

You know what? It’s fine for you to use it because we’re promoting an industry, a vital part of every community, and the professionals we work with, who do the same things you do, day in, day out. I hope you’ll consider the ad (attached as a pdf) and the others that come along. We have one from Randy Patrick at the Kentucky Standard and we’re working on designing that one.

By running these as space permits, you’re not promoting this or that particular newspaper. You’re not driving people to subscribe to some other paper. You are promoting your colleagues be they from a neighboring county or clear across the state.

If you feel it’s promoting another newspaper, and again it’s far from that, then send me your own story about why you love what you do and we’ll make that available to all KPA members. This industry needs to get away from being so competitive with each other. It’s not you against the world. It’s your industry, it’s the profession you’ve chosen, it’s what you do every day and it’s what your friends at other newspapers do. Every single day.

Press stickers for your windshield

I’ve mentioned our media passes before but forget to remind you about PRESS window stickers available from KPA. Now these won’t get you into paid parking lots at no cost and chances are someone might walk up to your windshield, “press” on it and then ask, “Why doesn’t it do anything when I ‘press’?”

press-sticker

But they’re available any way. Maybe it’s for a new staff member or someone who recently traded in a car and they need one for the new vehicle. Whatever the case, if you or staff members need a PRESS windshield sticker, just drop me a line.

Like the media passes, they’re available at no cost.

It must be political season in Kentucky

We pretty much know when there’s an election going on. The questions about political ads, letter to the editor campaigns and candidates wanting newspapers to go the extra mile to support them (without the candidate supporting the newspaper in buying ads sometimes) frequent the inbox and as incoming calls.

This week’s question comes from Dan Duncan, advertising director with the Morehead News. Just to make sure I gave Dan the correct answer, I ran the situation by the Registry for Election Finance. And the issue and answer reinforce the law that a political ad is one that is to “vote for or against an individual.” That’s a pretty simple definition. And note that “issues” are not included in the definition. Issues would be a wet-dry election or a tax increase submitted to the voters.

Here’s the scenario from Dan Duncan:

Two individuals, one the county road foreman, the other the head of the local veterans outreach office, have taken ads (which they paid for) thanking the current Judge Executive and the current magistrates for their support.  The road foreman is talking about “why” the roads are in such bad condition (weather) and that he and his crew have worked “thankless” hours without the support of citizens, and also thanks/mentions that  the current judge and magistrate for investing millions dollars in road equipment and the road department.

Nowhere in both ads do the authors “ask or solicit” a vote to keep these setting politicians in office, only praise for their “leadership.”

I realize this isn’t an “issue,” like my email last year, but using those guidelines (in support of defeat of an individual) these two ads wouldn’t require a political disclaimer.  Am I correct?

And from the Registry of Election Finance:

“The Registry agrees with Mr. Duncan’s assessment that the advertisement he has described would not seem to require a political advertising disclaimer.  However, please be aware that the Registry’s answer to the question would be different if it had been the candidate purchasing the advertisement using campaign funds (even if the ad used very similar language).

“As always, please contact the Registry by email or telephone when you have additional questions regarding any Kentucky election finance questions.  Have a great day.”

I deal primarily with Greg Cordier at the registry. Greg has done some political ad sessions for KPA at seminars and conventions. You can reach the registry at 502-573-2226 if you have a political ad question and want to bypass KPA. But you’re welcome to call me at 502-223-8821 and I’ll be glad to forward the situation to the registry to get you an answer.

Internships ready to begin

School’s out, or almost out with college commencements scheduled in the next few days, and that means summer is upon us. And with that comes the 2014 Kentucky Journalism Foundation internship program getting underway.

Although a couple of students will have their start date in a few weeks because of previous scheduling conflicts, a majority of the interns will start soon after the Spring semester ends. We should have placed a total of 26 interns this summer but will end with 24. Newspapers receiving interns are the Adair County Community Voice; Ashland Daily Independent; Carrollton News Democrat; Corbin News Journal; Corbin Times Tribute; Cynthiana Democrat; Elizabethtown News Enterprise; Frankfort State Journal; Georgetown News-Graphic; Grant County News; Kentucky New Era, Hopkinsville; LaRue County Herald News; Lebanon Enterprise; London Sentinel Echo; Louisville Courier-Journal; Mt. Sterling Advocate; Princeton Times Leader; Richmond Register; Somerset Commonwealth Journal; Tompkinsville News; and, West Kentucky News, Paducah.

The three Associates Division members serving as Host Companies are the Better Business Bureau, Louisville; Bluegrass State Games, Lexington; and Kentucky Utilities, Lexington.

A breakdown of students shows six from the University of Kentucky; four from Eastern Kentucky University; three each from Murray State and Transylvania universities; two each from Western Kentucky and Morehead State universities; and one each from Campbellsville University and the University of the Cumberlands.

At the end of the internship period, we will be publishing a story from each intern on what they did during the summer, their assessment of choosing communications as a career; and their plans for the future.

Invest in the future of our industry

The Foundation’s are provided by the rent KPA and KPS pay to the foundation on the Central Office and contributions from you! Your donation is critical. Over the past few years – which have been challenging financial times for all – we’ve never asked newspapers or individuals to make donations to the foundation.

Support the Foundation’s valuable work by sending your tax-deductible contribution today. A gift of any amount will make a difference to the future of the Bluegrass State’s industry.

Better yet, invest in a team of golfers for the Border War II ‘Battle at Crooked Creek’ golf outing on September 18. This year, Kentucky is hosting the second annual tournament against teams from the Tennessee Press Association.

golf-heading

Proceeds from entry fees and sponsorships go to the foundations of both state organizations. All of the money received by the Kentucky Journalism Foundation goes to fund internships with newspapers and our Associate members.

For more information and to sign up your team, or just yourself, click here BORDER WAR 2014

Today’s the deadline to make room reservations for Tennessee Press convention

You’re invited to Gatlinburg June 5 – 7 by our friends at the Tennessee Press Association for the group’s summer convention. We’ll be at the Park Vista Hotel, overlooking downtown Gatlinburg. But you need to make your room reservation TODAY! May 9 is the deadline and there are only a few rooms remaining.

tpa-convention

Again, here’s the information about the convention. Come on down!

Here’s a link to everything you need. Please note that the hotel reservation deadline is next Friday, May 9.

http://www.tnpress.com/summerconvention.html

FAA might not allow drone idea to fly for commercial purposes

A bird’s eye view of Drone Journalism

By Catherine Payne, NAA Content Producer

Drones are generating buzz, but drone journalism in the USA remains grounded – at least for now.

“It is a really weird and shifting landscape, especially for media organizations,” says Matt Waite, founder of the Drone Journalism Lab at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s College of Journalism and Mass Communications. He founded the lab in November 2011.

The Federal Aviation Administration currently prohibits the use of small, unmanned aerial vehicles for commercial purposes, including journalism. However, Congress ordered the FAA to safely integrate civil unmanned aircraft into the national airspace by September 2015.

“We all want clear, easy-to-understand and easy-to-comply-with rules of the road,” Waite says.

In March, an administrative law judge with the National Transportation Safety Board dismissed the FAA’s $10,000 fine against an entrepreneur who used a drone to shoot promotional video. The judge said the FAA did not have an enforceable rule. The FAA appealed the decision to the full safety board. The agency has said it aims to issue rules by the end of the year.

drone-lab

A group of leading news organizations filed a brief with the NTSB on Tuesday in support of the entrepreneur. The FAA’s ban violates the First Amendment’s newsgathering protection, they say.

As drone journalism waits in the wings, Waite gives a rundown of what it is.

On drone journalism: “It is using small, unmanned aerial vehicles to gather photo, video or data as an act of journalism,” Waite says. “They are able to get in the air quickly at a very low cost and get a perspective on a news event that would really greatly enhance people’s understanding of how big or how serious a situation is. Getting even a few hundred feet in the air would be extraordinarily advantageous in the aftermath of a tornado.”

On the size of a drone: The FAA is working on regulations for small systems, which they define as 55 pounds or less, Waite says. “Fifty-five pounds is enormous compared to the types most folks are experimenting with for journalism, filmmaking and commercial photography. We’re talking more in the realm of maybe 3 to 10 pounds.”

On the power source of a drone: The vast majority of them are battery-powered, but there are gas-powered models, Waite says. “They are a big leap up in complexity and cost — and I know of no one using them — but they do exist. The batteries are anywhere from the size of a king-sized candy bar to the size of a brick on a house.”

On the cost of a drone: “Not to sound like a used car salesman, but I can find a drone that fits your budget,” Waite says. “There are little toy models with relatively decent cameras that you can get for as little as $80. A lot of people are fascinated with a $300 device with a high-def camera that you can fly with your iPhone or Android device. I’ve seen $60,000 and $100,000 devices.”

On getting a drone: “You got a credit card and the Internet?” Waite asks. “Any number of companies can sell this to you.”

But Waite cautions that the FAA has banned the commercial use of drones. “The FAA says it has regulatory control,” he adds.

On using a drone: There are two groups who can use drones — hobbyists and the government, Waite says. Hobbyists can use them for fun but have to follow rules, he says.

“Government agencies – anyone from a dog catcher to customs and border patrol — can apply for a certificate of authorization,” Waite says. “It will allow a government entity to fly at a specific location for about a two-year period within a certain altitude, depending on where you are. Those permits are not easy to get.”

On the state of drone journalism: Some news organizations are very interested, but there is potential for problems, Waite says. “There are legal hassles. There are no rules in place right now to govern safety. There is no insurance requirement.”

On the future of drone journalism: The FAA is moving very slowly, Waite says. “The soonest that you’re going to see limited commercial use being possible without the FAA coming after you is November 2015. It’s probably more reasonable to assume early 2016.

“Once that happens, you’re going to see an industry appear overnight,” Waite says. “There are just hundreds and hundreds of applications of this that will suddenly be possible and journalism will be one.”

On drone journalism resources: There is the Drone Journalism Lab blog, and there is the Professional Society of Drone Journalists, Waite says.

He adds, “I just want to caution anybody interested in this that they really need to be aware of what the law is and what their state legislature is doing.”

First Published: May 07, 2014

Knight Center announces free online investigative journalism class

By Alan Krawitz, 10000 Words

If you’ve ever wanted to learn the nuts and bolts of investigative reporting, here’s your chance, courtesy of the Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas.

A five-week, massive open online course (MOOC) on “Investigative Journalism for the Digital Age,” will begin on May 12 and end on June 14, 2014.

MOOC is a new type of online learning program that was designed to reach a large number of students. In general, most MOOCs are college courses that have been recorded on video and adapted to be shared over the Internet.

This free course, designed to help teach about the newest resources and techniques in the field is open to journalists, journalism professors and journalism students alike and will be taught by four of the best investigative reporters in the country.

Several webinars on the horizon 

Thursday, May 15: Selling Digital webinar

Many companies are now spending over a quarter of their marketing budget on digital pursuits. Are you and your sales staff prepared to sell online and capture the lion’s share of that revenue?

This webinar will focus on trends in online advertising, internet marketing standards, building the relationship online and selling the digital value proposition.

This webinar will cover:

* Preparing for online ad sales.

* The Needs Analysis approach.

* Maximizing your effectiveness.

* Building a presentation that gives you the best chance for success.

Presenter Allan Barmak leads The Barmak Group, a sales consulting and training firm which leverages 20 years of sales experience in digital media. He has worked with a variety of companies across multiple industries, helping each of them expand their sales operations by optimizing existing revenue streams as well as building new ones.

He has been training newspaper sales teams for the last ten years and has unmatched experience selling the digital value proposition. Prior to starting his own consulting firm, he worked at AOL, where he was the top sales rep in the country for five of seven years and second to the lead the other two.

The $35 registration deadline is Monday, May 12 (registrations submitted after this date are subject to a $10 late fee). Group discounts are available. For more information, go to http://www.onlinemediacampus.com

And Inland is a webinar provider as well for KPA members at $25 each

KPA members receive a $25 rate for these webinars hosted by the Inland Press Association:

Wednesday, May 28, 3 p.m. Eastern/2 p.m. Central

Social Media: Finding audience, Finding Advertisers, Finding Digital Revenue Growth-Part II: It’s no secret that social media channels are exploding and demanding your attention. This webinar looks at the primary channels-including Facebook, Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn, YouTube, Instagram, Pinterest, Vine and Snapchat-and explores which works best for what audiences. You’ll learn what channels work best for advertisers, and how to prioritize each as you and your advertisers work towards achieving specific marketing goals.

With Shannon Kinney, Founder and Client Success Officer, Dream Local Digital

Thursday, May 29, 11:30 a.m. Eastern/10:30 a.m. Central

Data = Dollars: Tying It All Together

Data has become a buzzword, but it’s nothing new for newspapers.  You have been collecting email addresses and data across multiple platforms for years.  And when unified, that data can be used to drive audience and ad dollars. Presslaff Interactive Revenue will outline the steps for aggregating and collecting your local data, ways to tie third-party data to your email database and show you how to leverage it to increase reader loyalty and revenue.

With Michelle Novak, Manager, Client Sales & Service

Friday, May 30  11:30 a.m. Eastern/10:30 a.m. Central

5 Essential But ‘Non-Conventional’ Key Performance Indicators

As publishing companies diversify their paid content offerings, and as subscribers become platform-agnostic content consumers, what are the 5 essential, but non-conventional key performance indicators that you should be tracking to measure audience engagement and growth? Find out in this session.

With Daniel Williams, CEO, Leap Media Solutions, LLC

For information on the three Inland Press Association webinars, go to http://www.inlandpress.biz/webinars2014/?ref=04009014

Friday, May 16  11:30 a.m./Eastern 10:30 a.m. Central **Date changed!**

The Importance of a Carefully Drafted Social Media Policy

Employees’ social media activities — whether for professional or personal usage, on- or off-the-clock, from one’s work computer or personal mobile device – may impact your business in more ways than you might expect. Putting a social media policy into effect that attempts to limit what your employees can access at work and say about your company on social media platforms has to be done thoughtfully so it will not infringe on employees’ rights. This session  will address the need to develop a social media policy and potential legal pitfalls you may encounter along the way. We will also provide pointers on crafting your policy so as to walk the line between protecting your legitimate business interests and staying out of court.

With Rich Lapp, partner at Seyfarth Shaw LLP in Chicago

\Wednesday, May 28  3 p.m. Eastern/2 p.m. Central

Social Media: Finding audience, Finding Advertisers, Finding Digital Revenue Growth-Part II:  It’s no secret that social media channels are exploding and demanding your attention. This webinar looks at the primary channels–including Facebook, Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn, Youtube, Instagram, Pinterest, Vine and Snapchat–and explores which works best for what audiences. You’ll learn what channels work best for advertisers, and how to prioritize each as you and your advertisers work towards achieving specific marketing goals.

With Shannon Kinney, Founder and Client Success Officer, Dream Local Digital

\Thursday, May 29 11:30 a.m. Eastern/10:30 a.m. Central   

Data = Dollars: Tying It All Together

Data has become a buzzword, but it’s nothing new for newspapers.  You have been collecting email addresses and data across multiple platforms for years.  And when unified, that data can be used to drive audience and ad dollars.  Presslaff Interactive Revenue will outline the steps for aggregating and collecting your local data, ways to tie third-party data to your email database and show you how to leverage it to increase reader loyalty and revenue.

With Michelle Novak, Manager, Client Sales & Service

]Friday, May 30  |  10:30 a.m. CDT

5 Essential But ‘Non-Conventional’ Key Performance Indicators

As publishing companies diversify their paid content offerings, and as subscribers become platform-agnostic content consumers, what are the 5 essential, but non-conventional key performance indicators that you should be tracking to measure audience engagement and growth? Find out in this session.

With Daniel Williams, CEO, Leap Media Solutions, LLC

 …………………………………………………………………………..

Watch for information for these great webinars coming in June!

Thursday, June 12  |  2 p.m. CDT

Audience Development 2.0: Direct & Indirect Consumer Monetization

Do you REALLY know the total value of your customers across all the ways they engage with your brand? In this session, Daniel Williams will demonstrate how disparate data can be tied together to calculate the true value of each customer relationship, and why this is important in the age of Audience Development 2.0.

With Daniel Williams, CEO, Leap Media Solutions, LLC

Tuesday, June 17  |  2 p.m. CDT

Email Marketing Best Practices in a Mobile World

Over half of all emails are now opened on a mobile device. And 30% of consumers report they will unsubscribe if an email doesn’t render properly. It’s more important than ever to consider how mobile impacts the design and content in your email marketing strategy. Presslaff Interactive Revenue will show you the best practices for creating mobile-friendly emails that also work well on desktops … and most importantly … are opened and read!

With Ruth Presslaff, President, Presslaff Interactive Revenue

Tuesday, June 24  |  2 p.m. CDT

Digital Agency Bootcamp–Can This Work in My Market?

This webinar provides a primer on the promise and the challenge of offering digital agency services. You’ll learn what goes into making a successful digital services enterprise, and what kind of structure will work best for your organization. We’ll explore the importance differences between selling marketing and advertising, and why solution selling matters. You’ll learn how to evaluate your resources for digital agency services, the strategies that best fit your organization, and the tactics and products that will build lifetime customers and reduce advertiser churn.

With Shannon Kinney, Founder and Client Success Officer, Dream Local Digital

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